Monday, February 11, 2019

The Impossible Slider

After an impromptu Pocket Cookies reunion show in the South Suburbs this weekend (we were terrible, but the audience was kind), I decided to head on over to the local White Castle for some delicious burgers. While awaiting my usual gallbladder-busting order, I noticed something called "The Impossible Slider" for $1.99. A quick Google search revealed the concept behind this burger. I added one to my order.

Impossible meat is the brain child of Impossible Foods, a company that develops plant-based substitutes for meat and dairy products. The so-called Impossible Burger is said by many to be a very close approximation of the taste, texture and flavor of an "actual" burger. How do they achieve this "impossible" feat? Scientists at Impossible Foods discovered a plant-based heme molecule. The heme molecule, when present in meat, is a key factor in how meat behaves. Heme gives blood its red color and helps carry oxygen in living organisms. It is abundant in animal muscle tissue and is also found naturally in all living organisms. Plants, particularly nitrogen-fixing plants and legumes, also contain heme. Using heme along with proteins and fats derived from plants, Impossible Foods created a burger that sears and "bleeds" when cooked.

But, how does it taste? You know what, if I had to eat this stuff for the rest of my life, I wouldn't be tempted towards suicide right away. Unlike the regular 99 cent veggie slider, which tastes like packed ashes, the Impossible Slider does actually taste like an traditional burger. I had hoped that it would be more like an approximation of a regular slider, but that's apparently not what they were going for here. The Impossible Slider is a thicker patty so it tastes a lot like a burger shot slider. Not what I was expecting, but still a pretty decent burger.

If you're interested in trying an Impossible Slider yourself, they are available at all 377 White Castle locations. Further, different types of Impossible Burgers are available at over 3,000 different locations in the United States and Hong Kong.

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