Friday, January 11, 2019

The Nest Yale Smart Lock

When I was growing up, my father was paranoid about house keys. We had gotten robbed when one of my brothers' friends swiped his key and used it to enter the house when he knew when we'd be away for the weekend. So, in my dad's mind, between my parents and my siblings, there were seven keys representing seven potential security breaches. When I was in high school, I lost my key while studying in the local library. I informed my father who then bemoaned the prospect of having to replace seven keys. I figured that, since neither my name nor address had been etched into my key, anyone who found it would have no clue what house it went to, so, theoretically, they'd have to blindly go house to house in order to find the correct deadbolt. And anyone who took the time trying the key in every deadbolt in town probably deserved to have our stuff. My father wasn't pleased with my "logic" and the lock was quickly changed out.

The Nest Yale Lock in All Its Glory!
My point in telling that story is that locks aren't the end-all of home security. Yes, a lock is a deterrent, and is a first-line of defense, but, if someone really wants to break into your house, a deadbolt isn't going to stop them. A front door lock is a means of managing access. To that end, I purchased a Nest Yale lock to integrate with my smart home. The Nest Yale smart lock requires a Nest hub in order to work with full capabilities and integrate into Google Home, so, if you're thinking about purchasing one, make sure that you buy the model that comes with the Nest hub or get one separately.

Installation was pretty easy as the Nest Yale smart lock installs much like a traditional deadbolt. The issue is that the deadbolt has to fit perfectly into the latch in order for the lock to work as expected. Previously, we had been closing the door and pushing it in an extra inch in order to securely lock the deadbolt. This meant that the original deadbolt had not been seated properly. So, when I would ask Nest to lock the door, the deadbolt wouldn't be able to fully extend, which would lead to an error.

Upon further inspection, I discovered that the locks had been changed more than once and that a number of previous screw holes had been put into the door and into the latches. I had to buy some wood putty in order to fill in the old screw holes so that I could properly screw in the Nest Yale lock.

One issue that I have with the Nest Yale smart lock is that it doesn't come with a door handle. My whole purpose in buying the lock is so that I won't have to worry about carrying my house keys. So, I can either unlock the door via the keypad using the keycode I gave myself or I could unlock it via the app on my phone. Yet, having a lockable doorknob on my door defeats the purpose of having a smart deadbolt. So, I had to replace the doorknob with a handle that matched the Nest Yale smart lock. I get it: Nest and Yale don't want to get into the complex issues that come with having to offer multiple iterations of their lock. Offering three colors is enough. Best to push off the handle issue onto the consumer in order to keep things simple. It's still a tad frustrating.

Overall, I'm pleased with how my Nest Yale smart lock works. Everyone in the house has downloaded the Nest app and have created their own code for access to unlock the front door. There was, however, one noticeable objection to this system: In a "you're not my REAL dad" moment, one of the teens wondered if I was using the lock to keep track of their comings and goings. Okay, yes, in theory the Nest Yale smart lock could be used to do that. But, I really don't care who is locking and and unlocking the door and I don't care when they're doing it. I just want to be able to get into my house without my keys if I need to. So, for those in the house who don't want to be tracked, they can use the side door or the back door which still have traditional locks on them. For now.

I haven't made use of Privacy Mode yet, which turns off the outside keypad so that even people with access can't use their codes. They can still open the door via the app though. I'm sure I'll enable it when we go on vacation in March.

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