Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Error 1935 When Installing A Third Party App On Windows 10

I've had to install a lot of apps on a Windows 10 virtual desktop image lately and have run into a lot of frustration regarding Error 1935 and a message similar to "An error occurred during the installation of assembly...". Scouring the Internet, I saw a lot of references to uninstalling and re-installing the .NET framework and/or Windows Installer. And while that seems to have worked for a small number of people, I didn't want to take that drastic step unless I absolutely had no other options. A lot of other people had better luck with resetting the Windows file system transaction log. In order to do that, you drop down to a command prompt and type:

fsutil resource setautoreset true C:\

But how can the Windows file system transaction log be full on a fresh install? It made no sense to me, but I tried it anyway. And guess what? It didn't work.

I started to wonder if perhaps it had something to do with installing 32bit apps on a 64bit operating system. Normally, it isn't much of an issue, but I could see where perhaps an installer is trying to force something into the wrong sized peg. That line of thinking brought me to registry size, which should be unlimited in anything past Windows XP. But what if some third party installers are still doing a check for a size limit? Maybe the code is checking for a size limit, finding it undefined and assuming that it's used up? It was worth a try, and it beat potentially spending a day mucking with .NET framework and Windows Installer. I dove into the registry via regedit.exe and did the following.

  • Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control
  • Created a REG_DWORD Key: RegistrySizeLimit
  • Set the value of that key to: ffffffff (hexadecimal).
  • Reboot
That did the trick. I suspect that a number of third party installers are inadvertently using some old code that is checking for a size limit on the registry and in some unique cases are spitting out an error when they can't find one. I don't have the time or desire to track down the exact circumstances that cause the error. I just know that this solution works even though it really shouldn't. Just for safety sake, I would take out the key after successfully doing the install. Or, at least run sfc /scannow to make sure nothing has mucked up your machine. 

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